SPEAKERS BUREAU

The Phoenix Holocaust Survivors' Association provides speakers for programs effectively structured to provide Holocaust education to specific or appropriate audiences.

Telling Their Stories

Many Phoenix Holocaust Survivors' Association members speak to audiences about their experiences and stories.
A sample of survivors' stories can be viewed here.

If your school, community organization or religious organization wants to learn about the Holocaust from a local resident who lived through it the Phoenix Holocaust Survivors' Association has many different types of speakers to fit the needs of your educational program. In addition to survivors, there are also descendants of Holocaust Survivors who offer personal accounts of the continuing impact of the Holocaust (Growing Up with Holocaust Survivor Parents: A Personal Story) and recount the stories of Survivors that are no longer with us.

The four types of speakers available for your program:

  • Survivors: experiences which include concentration camps, escape to other countries, those who hid in the woods or passed as Aryans
  • Child Survivors: children hidden during the War or sent on Kindertransport (organized child rescue effort)
  • Descendants of Survivors: discuss the continuing impact of the Holocaust and recount the stories of survivors that are no longer with us
  • Liberators: Allied troops and other individuals who assisted with the liberation of various concentration camps

If your group or organization is interested in having a speaker, please complete the Speaker Request form below or contact the Phoenix Holocaust Survivors' Association at 602-788-7003.

Please note that our remaining survivor speakers are elderly and may need assistance when they arrive on your site.

Testimonies

“Many students learn about the Holocaust, but many believe everything ended in 1945.  Hearing a second or third generation survivor opens their eyes to the fact that 1945 was not the end, and what survivors experienced had a powerful impact on how they raised their children after WWII. These speakers provide moving testimony for how such a tragedy affects families for generations”.

Kim Klett
English teacher at Dobson High
Member of Regional Education Corps, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum